The Rocky Horror Picture Show


SHOW TIMES


Saturday, December 15th
at 7:30PM
The Rich Weirdoes
20th Century Fox


The Rocky Horror Picture Show with shadow cast
featuring...THE RICH WEIRDOES

Running time: 1 hour 40 minutes

Rated  R


Cast:  Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick
 
Due to its celebrated history of over 30 years of decadent delight,
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW has become the longest running, fully interactive audience participation film in the world!
However, there are many people who have never been to a live, interactive cinematic experience before... or have always wanted to and didn't know what to expect.
Well, here is a quick run-down of the three main components of what makes Rocky Horror so freakin' amazing:

1- The Film: "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" (a.k.a. RHPS, Rocky Horror, or just "Rocky") is a film based on a musical made in the early 1970's in England.
If you know anything about British humor (see Monty Python, or Absolutely Fabulous), you'll know it's one of the most bizarre out there.
The original musical was a campy comedy making fun of all the horrible sci-fi and “B”-movies of the 1940's, 50’s and 60's: A variety of weird and naughty things happen to a nice, little Middle-American couple (Brad & Janet).
When they stumble upon an annual convention of aliens, all lead by a cross-dressing doctor bent on making himself a Frankenstein-style monster/playmate.
Depravity, singing, dancing, and eventually, mutiny round out the play. The play turned into a movie. The movie flopped. The movie started playing at midnight. People started showing up to it...

2- The Cast: The Rocky Horror experience is enhanced by what is know as a "shadow cast".
A shadow cast is a group of performers who study the film or video recordings for the sole purpose of adapting/interpreting it into a pantomime stage performance.
When done well, everything that goes on in the film is performed by live actors in perfect synch while the film or video plays above them.
Some performers focus on screen accuracy, hoping to make their costumes, makeup, choreography, gestures, etc. as much of a direct replica of what is pictured on the screen above them.
Others prefer to blend screen accuracy with their own quirks or improvisations, resulting in humorous, sometimes thematic, over-the-top interpretations of the film.

3- The Audience: Yes, YOU get to be part of the show:
Many audience members express themselves through attire: whether to mimic their favorite characters, elicit a reaction from fellow theater-goers, or to flaunt their own flavor of depravity.
Also, the audience (along with some painfully well-versed comedians on cast) participate in an ongoing litany of jokes, sight gags and other humorous banter.
Many of the jokes at a Rocky performance hail from a long tradition of burlesque ribaldry.
In other words, the jokes at a typical Rocky Horror performance tend to be a bit on the nasty/naughty/raunchy/un-politically correct side so, as a warning:

!!! - If you're not offended, we didn't do our job. - !!!

So, if you're prepared to let go of your inhibitions (even if only for one night), laugh at everything you've been told not to (including YOURSELF) and "let your freak flag fly," then you've come to the right place.
Really ... nothing is sacred ... nothing.



The Nutcracker


SHOW TIMES


Thursday, December 13th
at 6:3
0PM

Tuesday, December 18th
at
1:00PM

Thursday, December 20th
at 
6:30PM


CineLife


The Nutcracker

Running time: 1 hour 53 minutes

Not Rated 

Cast:      Iana Salenko and Marian Walter
 
After a long wait, the Staatsballett Berlin goes back to the Nutcracker, one of the most popular ballets in the world. Vasily Medvedev and Yuri Burlaka, two fine choreographers of the Russian tradition, developed this version based on the historical scenography and original choreography of 1892. The scenography and costumes were recreated from precious Russian archives.
This choreography, created for the world premiere by Lev Ivanov, is largely based on his recommendations. He gave this ballet its inimitable style which still influences the greatest contemporary choreographers.
Associated with the brilliance of contemporary dance, this production is a reconstruction conceived as a great fairy that reveals all its nostalgic charm and celebrates the spirit of Christmas. The music of Tchaikovsky, a true masterpiece, immediately evokes the fall of snowflakes and the scent of Christmas spices.




Jim Henson's Holiday Special


SHOW TIMES


Sunday, December 16th
at

1:00PM and 4:00PM

Fathom Events


Jim Henson’s Holiday Special
Featuring Emmet Otter and Fraggle Rock

Running time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Not Rated 

Celebrate the holidays with Jim Henson! Two beloved specials have been remastered and are coming to the big screen, Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas and The Bells of Fraggle Rock. The event includes an all-new featurette with a special guest!

Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas
Based on a book by Russell and Lillian Hoben, this beloved Christmas story, with music from Paul Williams and an all-puppet cast of woodland creatures, tells the story of Ma and Emmet Otter - a family that has little more than each other. When a talent show is held in town, a fifty-dollar prize gives them each hope of buying the other a real present this year.

The Bells of Fraggle Rock
Deftly addressing the melancholy many people feel during the holidays as they struggle to find meaning in the special time of year "The Bells of Fraggle Rock" begins as Gobo Fraggle wonders why he doesn't have his normal excitement over The Festival of the Bells, the most wonderful day of the year for Fraggles. Though his friends try to cheer him up, Gobo ventures on an expedition to the center of Fraggle Rock - a journey that teaches him the importance of individual faith.



Pink Floyd: THE WALL


SHOW TIMES


Saturday, December 8th
at
8:00PM


Warner Brothers Classics


Pink Floyd: THE WALL

Running time: 1 hour 35 minutes

Rated R

Bob Geldof, Christine Hargreaves, James Laurenson
 
Rock star Pink Floyd is a tortured soul. Because of his childhood, he has always tried to make meaningful emotional connections to other living creatures. That childhood includes not having a male role model with his father having been killed in the war, his overprotective mother smothering him, and an oppressive school system quashing his natural creativity. Being a rock star, he is often wanted more because of what he is than who he is. The most recent failure in that true connection to someone or something else is his marriage, when on tour, he discovers that his wife back home is cheating on him. His response is to go in the opposite direction, by building a figurative wall around him to isolate himself from the rest of the world, but not before showing graphically his feelings on different gut levels. The question becomes if he or anyone else can do anything to tear down the wall in a meaningful way.



Mamma Mia!


SHOW TIMES


Saturday, January 19th
at 7:00PM

Sunday, January 20th

at 2:00PM

Saturday, February 16th
at 7:00PM

Saturday, March 2nd
at 7:00PM

Satuday, March 16th
at 7:00PM

Saturday, April 6th
at 7:00PM

Saturday, May 18th
at 7:00PM



The Rich Weirdoes
Universal Pictures


Mamma Mia! with shadow cast featuring...
THE RICH WEIRDOES

Running time: 1 hour 48 minutes

Rated PG-13 for some sex-related comments


Cast:  Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan, Amanda Seyfried
 
1- The Film:
Set on a colorful Greek island, the plot serves as a background for a wealth of ABBA songs. A young woman about to be married discovers that any one of three men could be her father. She invites all three to the wedding without telling her mother, Donna, who was once the lead singer of Donna and the Dynamos. In the meantime, Donna has invited her backup singers, Rosie and Tanya.

2- The Cast: 
A shadow cast is a group of performers who study the film or video recordings for the sole purpose of adapting/interpreting it into a pantomime stage performance.
When done well, everything that goes on in the film is performed by live actors in perfect synch while the film or video plays above them.
Some performers focus on screen accuracy, hoping to make their costumes, makeup, choreography, gestures, etc. as much of a direct replica of what is pictured on the screen above them.
Others prefer to blend screen accuracy with their own quirks or improvisations, resulting in humorous, sometimes thematic, over-the-top interpretations of the film.

3- The Audience: Yes, YOU get to be part of the show:
Many audience members express themselves through attire: whether to mimic their favorite characters, elicit a reaction from fellow theater-goers, or to flaunt their own flavor.
Also, the audience (along with some painfully well-versed comedians on cast) participate in an ongoing litany of jokes, sight gags, and other humorous banter.



They Shall Not Grow Old


SHOW TIMES


Monday, December 17th
at

4:00PM and 7:00PM

Thursday, December 27th
at

1:00PM and 4:00PM


Fathom Events


They Shall Not Grow Old

Running time: 2 hours

Rated R
 
Fathom Events and Warner Bros. Pictures have partnered to bring Academy Award® winner Peter Jackson’s poignant WWI documentary They Shall Not Grow Old to cinemas.
Jackson recorded a special introduction to the film—which he has called his most personal—offering his perspective on why the film is important for audiences, who have never experienced WWI footage as anything but grainy black & white…and silent. In “They Shall Not Grow Old,” Jackson opens a window to the past in a way that has never been seen or heard before, noting, “Restoration is a humanizing process.” The screening will be immediately followed by special content offering firsthand insights into what went into this groundbreaking feat of research, filmmaking and storytelling.
The acclaimed documentary is an extraordinary look at the soldiers and events of the Great War, using film footage captured at the time, now presented in a way the world has never seen. By utilizing state-of-the-art restoration, and colorization, and pulling from 600 hours of BBC archival interviews, Jackson puts forth an intensely gripping, immersive and authentic experience through the eyes and voices of the British soldiers who lived it.



Degas: Passion For Perfection


SHOW TIMES


Thursday, December 13th
at
6:30PM

Tuesday, December 18th
at
1:30PM


Exhibition on Screen


Degas: Passion For Perfection

Running time: 1 hour 25 minutes

Not Rated 

Directed by David Bickerstaff
 
EXHIBITION ON SCREEN journeys from the streets of Paris to the heart of a superb exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, whose extensive collection of Degas’ works is the most representative in Britain. With exclusive access to view rare and diverse works, this film tells a fascinating story of Degas’ pursuit for perfection through both experimentation with new techniques and lessons learnt from studying the past masters.
Sometimes frustrated by his own failings, Degas was consumed by obsessive principles and failing eye sight but his determination to capture everyday life was evident in every mark he made. Never fully satisfied, many of Degas’ drawings and sculptures were kept in private during his lifetime but, now through close examination, they can be seen as some of the most beautifully detailed and expressive works in the modern era. Using written accounts by friends and commentators, and the narration of letters written by Degas himself, this film reveals a more complex truth behind one of the most influential French artists of the late 19th-century and serves as an exploration of the complex workings of Degas’ artistic mind.



Goya: Visions of Flesh and Blood

Renoir: Revered and Reviled

SHOW TIMES


Wednesday,
December 12th
at
1:00PM


Exhibition on Screen


Goya: Visions of Flesh and Blood

Running time: 1 hour 36 minutes

Not Rated 


Heir to Velázquez, hero to Picasso. Discover Spain’s celebrated artist with this cinematic tour de force based on the National Gallery’s must-see exhibition Goya: The Portraits.
Francisco Goya is Spain’s most celebrated artist and considered the father of modern art. Not only a brilliant observer of everyday life and Spain’s troubled past, he is a gifted portrait painter and social commentator par excellence. Goya takes the genre of portraiture to new heights and his genius is reappraised in a much-anticipated landmark exhibition at The National Gallery, London. The film uses this exhibition to look in depth at Goya’s eventful life.
Through extensive location footage, Goya’s revealing letters and a unique exhibition of masterpieces from great collections across the world, this film builds a fascinating portrait of the painter and the colourful world he painted. Influenced by Rembrandt and Velázquez, Goya explored a new realism where he did not flatter and was not afraid to reveal what he saw physically and psychologically. Yet this did not stop him securing major commissions from powerful individuals seeking the prestige of being painted by the best artist of the day. Royalty, aristocrats, politicians and close friends were subjected to his highly modern approach that captured rapid changes of expression, gesture and emotion. Goya’s powerful vision and technical brilliance makes him one of the most admired and revered artists in the world today and indeed among the greatest painters to have lived.



-- -- DOUBLE FEATURE PRESENTATION -- --


Renoir: Revered and Reviled

Running time: 1 hour 27 minutes

Not Rated 


Pierre-Auguste Renoir is known and loved for his impressionist paintings of Paris. These paintings count among the world’s favourites. Renoir, however, grew tired of this style and changed course. This stunning film – based on the remarkable collection of 181 Renoirs at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia – examines the direction he then took and why it provokes such extreme reactions right up to today. Some claim they are repulsed by Renoir’s later works and some claim they are seduced. What may surprise many is that among the many artists who sought Renoir’s new works out and were clearly highly influenced by them were the two giants of the 20th century – Picasso and Matisse. The film is a fresh new biography of this artistic giant but more than that it uncovers a rarely told story that places Renoir as a critical link between the old and the new.



Julie


SHOW TIMES


Thursday, December 6th
at 6:30PM


National Theatre Live


Julie

Running time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Not Rated 

Cast:  Vanessa Kirby and Eric Kofi Abrefa 
 
Wild and newly single, Julie throws a late night party. In the kitchen, Jean and Kristina clean up as the celebration heaves above them. Crossing the threshold, Julie initiates a power game with Jean – which rapidly descends into a savage fight for survival.
This new version of August Strindberg’s play Miss Julie, written by Polly Stenham, remains shocking and fiercely relevant in its new setting of contemporary London.



The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time


SHOW TIMES


Thursday, December 20th
at 1:00PM


National Theatre Live


The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Running time: 2 hours 50 minutes

Not Rated 

Cast:  Luke Treadaway, Niamh Cusack, Paul Ritter, Nicola Walker, Una Stubbs 
 
Christopher, fifteen years old, stands beside Mrs Shears’ dead dog. It has been speared with a garden fork, it is seven minutes after midnight and Christopher is under suspicion. He records each fact in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of who murdered Wellington. He has an extraordinary brain, exceptional at maths while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. He has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road, he detests being touched and he distrusts strangers. But his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey that upturns his world.



The Madness of George III


SHOW TIMES


Tuesday, December 11th
at 
6:30PM

Wednesday,
Dec
ember 19th
at 6:30PM


National Theatre Live


The Madness of George III

Running time: 3 hours 30 minutes

Not Rated 

Cast:  Mark Gatiss and Adrian Scarborough
 
It’s 1786 and King George III is the most powerful man in the world. But his behaviour is becoming increasingly erratic as he succumbs to fits of lunacy. With the King’s mind unravelling at a dramatic pace, ambitious politicians and the scheming Prince of Wales threaten to undermine the power of the Crown, and expose the fine line between a King and a man.



Wonders of the Sea 3D


SHOW TIMES


Thursday, January 17th
at
7:00PM



Fathom Events


Wonders of the Sea 3D

Running time: 1 hour 40 minutes 

Rated G

Narrated by:  Arnold Schwarzenegger
 
Wonders of the Sea 3D takes viewers on a trip under the ocean, capturing incredible footage of rarely seen sea creatures, while warning about the impacts of climate change. From Fiji to the Bahamas, Jean Michel Cousteau and his children Celine and Fabien embark on a voyage to discover the ocean as never before seen and learn more about the threats that put our ocean at risk.
Narrated by renowned environmentalist Arnold Schwarzenegger, Wonders of the Sea showcases awe-inspiring scenery, in breathtaking 3D. It makes it feel like you’re diving alongside the Cousteau family, close to the creatures but without getting wet! These rarely-seen multicolored creatures performing in an exceptionally vibrant underwater world will fascinate, educate and entertain the whole family.
Wonders of the Sea 3D is a once-in-a-lifetime experience and a declaration of love to the ocean.



Buttons, a new musical film


SHOW TIMES


Saturday, December 8th
at 12:55PM


Fathom Events


Buttons, a new musical film

Running time: 1 hour 55 minutes 

Not Rated - treat as PG 

NARRATED BY  --  Robert Redford
STARRING -- Abigail Spencer, Jane Seymour, Roma Downey, Ioan Gruffudd, Katie McGrath, Robert Picardo, Charles Shaughnessy, Paul Greene, John de Lancie, Dick Van Dyke, Angela Lansbury
 
From creator/director Tim Janis comes Buttons, a new heartwarming musical film...



White Christmas


SHOW TIMES


Sunday, December 9th
at 7:00PM

Wednesday,
December 12th

at 2:00PM


Fathom Events


White Christmas (1954)

Running time: 2 hours 10 minutes 

Not Rated

STARRING -- Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney
 
Two talented song-and-dance men (Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye) team up after the war to become one of the hottest acts in show business. One winter they join forces with a sister act (Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen) and trek to Vermont for a white Christmas. The result is stuff dreams are made of.

This two-day event includes exclusive insight from Turner Classic Movies.



The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata


SHOW TIMES


LIVE!
Saturday, December 15th
at
12:55PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday,
December 19th

at
1:00PM and 6:30PM



Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  La Traviata

Running time: 3 hours  32 minutes

Not Rated
Sung in Italian with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Yannick Nézet-Séguin
STARRING -- Diana Damrau, Juan Diego Flórez, Quinn Kelsey   
 
ACT I
Violetta Valéry knows that she will die soon, exhausted by her restless life as a courtesan. At a party she is introduced to Alfredo Germont, who has been fascinated by her for a long time. Rumor has it that he has been enquiring after her health every day. The guests are amused by this seemingly naïve and emotional attitude, and they ask Alfredo to propose a toast. He celebrates true love, and Violetta responds in praise of free love. She is touched by his candid manner and honesty. Suddenly she feels faint, and the guests withdraw. Only Alfredo remains behind and declares his love. There is no place for such feelings in her life, Violetta replies. But she gives him a camellia, asking him to return when the flower has faded. He realizes this means he will see her again the following day. Alone, Violetta is torn by conflicting emotions—she doesn’t want to give up her way of life, but at the same time she feels that Alfredo has awakened her desire to be truly loved.

ACT II
Violetta has chosen a life with Alfredo, and they enjoy their love in the country, far from society. When Alfredo discovers that this is only possible because Violetta has been selling her property, he immediately leaves for Paris to procure money. Violetta has received an invitation to a masked ball, but she no longer cares for such distractions. In Alfredo’s absence, his father, Giorgio Germont, pays her a visit. He demands that she separate from his son, as their relationship threatens his daughter’s impending marriage. But over the course of their conversation, Germont comes to realize that Violetta is not after his son’s money—she is a woman who loves unselfishly. He appeals to Violetta’s generosity of spirit and explains that, from a bourgeois point of view, her liaison with Alfredo has no future. Violetta’s resistance dwindles and she finally agrees to leave Alfredo forever. Only after her death shall he learn the truth about why she returned to her old life. She accepts the invitation to the ball and writes a goodbye letter to her lover. Alfredo returns, and while he is reading the letter, his father appears to console him. But all the memories of home and a happy family can’t prevent the furious and jealous Alfredo from seeking revenge for Violetta’s apparent betrayal.
At the masked ball, news has spread of Violetta and Alfredo’s separation. There are grotesque dance entertainments, ridiculing the duped lover. Meanwhile, Violetta and her new lover, Baron Douphol, have arrived. Alfredo and the baron battle at the gaming table and Alfredo wins a fortune: lucky at cards, unlucky in love. When everybody has withdrawn, Alfredo confronts Violetta, who claims to be truly in love with the baron. In his rage Alfredo calls the guests as witnesses and declares that he doesn’t owe Violetta anything. He throws his winnings at her. Giorgio Germont, who has witnessed the scene, rebukes his son for his behavior. The baron challenges his rival to a duel.

ACT III
Violetta is dying. Her last remaining friend, Doctor Grenvil, knows that she has only a few more hours to live. Alfredo’s father has written to Violetta, informing her that his son was not injured in the duel. Full of remorse, Germont has told his son about Violetta’s sacrifice. Alfredo wants to rejoin her as soon as possible. Violetta is afraid that he might be too late. The sound of rampant celebrations are heard outside while Violetta is in mortal agony. But Alfredo does arrive and the reunion fills her with a final euphoria. Her energy and exuberant joy of life return. All sorrow and suffering seem to have left her—a final illusion, before death claims her.





Bolshoi Ballet: The Nutcracker


SHOW TIMES


Sunday, December 23rd
at 12:55PM



Fathom Events


Bolshoi Ballet: The Nutcracker (2018)

Running time: 2 hours 20 minutes 

Not Rated - treat as PG


Captured live the same day from the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow, The Nutcracker comes to cinemas across the U.S.

On Christmas Eve, Marie’s Nutcracker doll magically transforms into a prince, and together their wonderful adventure begins. The Nutcracker invites audiences of all ages on a magical journey, through a world of enchantment, complete with dancing snowflakes and dolls that have come to life, accompanied by Tchaikovsky’s beloved score. The timeless holiday classic returns to the Bolshoi stage this December.




The Metropolitan Opera: Adriana Lecouvreur


SHOW TIMES


LIVE!
Saturday, January 12th
at
12:55PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday, January 16th
at
1:00PM and 6:30PM



Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  Adriana Lecouvreur

Running time: 4 hours

Not Rated
Sung in Italian with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Gianandrea Noseda
STARRING -- Anna Netrebko, Piotr Beczata, Anita Rachvelishvili, Ambrogio Maestri   
 
ACT I
Paris, 1730. Backstage at the Comédie-Française, the director Michonnet and the company prepare for performance, in which both Adriana Lecouvreur and her rival, Mademoiselle Duclos, will appear. The Prince of Bouillon and the Abbé de Chazeuil enter, looking for Duclos, who is the prince’s mistress. They encounter Adriana and compliment her, but she says that she is merely the servant of the creative spirit (“Io son l’umile ancella”). The Prince hears that Duclos is writing a letter to someone and arranges to have it intercepted. Left alone with Adriana, Michonnet confesses his love to her, only to be told that she is in love with Maurizio, whom she believes to be an officer in the service of the Count of Saxony. Maurizio enters, declaring his love for Adriana (“La dolcissima effigie”), and the two arrange to meet after the performance. Adriana gives him a bouquet of violets as a pledge of her love. During the performance, the prince intercepts the letter from Duclos, in which she asks for a meeting with Maurizio, who is in fact the Count of Saxony himself. He is to meet her later that evening at the villa where the prince has installed her. Determined to expose his seemingly unfaithful mistress, the prince arranges a party at the villa for this same night. Unknown to him, Duclos has written the letter on behalf of the Princess of Bouillon who was having an affair with Maurizio. Maurizio, receiving the letter, decides to meet the princess who has helped him pursue his political ambitions. He sends a note to Adriana to cancel their appointment. Adriana is upset, but when the prince invites her to the party and tells her that the Prince of Saxony will be one of the guests, she accepts in the hope of furthering her lover’s career.

ACT II
The princess anxiously awaits Maurizio at the villa (“Acerba voluttà”). When he appears she notices the violets and immediately suspects another woman but he quickly claims they are a gift for her. Grateful for her help at court, he reluctantly admits that he no longer loves her (“L’anima ho stanca”). The princess hides when her husband and the Abbé suddenly arrive, congratulating Maurizio on his latest conquest, who they think is Duclos. Adriana appears. She is astounded to learn that the Count of Saxony is Maurizio himself but forgives his deception. When Michonnet enters looking for Duclos, Adriana assumes that Maurizio has come to the villa for a secret rendezvous with her. He assures her that the woman hiding next door is not Duclos. His meeting with her, he says, was purely political and they must arrange for her escape. Trusting him, Adriana agrees. In the ensuing confusion, neither Adriana nor the princess recognize each other, but by the few words that are spoken each woman realizes that the other is in love with Maurizio. Adriana is determined to discover the identity of her rival, but the princess escapes, dropping a bracelet that Michonnet picks up and hands to Adriana.

ACT III
As preparations are under way for a party at her palace, the princess wonders who her rival might be. Guests arrive, among them Michonnet and Adriana. The princess recognizes Adriana’s voice as that of the woman who helped her escape. Her suspicions are confirmed when she pretends Maurizio has been wounded in a duel and Adriana almost faints. She recovers quickly, however, when Maurizio enters uninjured and entertains the guests with tales of his military exploits (“Il russo Mencikoff”). During the performance of a ballet, the princess and Adriana confront each other, in growing recognition that they are rivals. The princess mentions the violets, and Adriana in turn produces the bracelet, which the prince identifies as his wife’s. To distract attention, the princess suggests that Adriana should recite a monologue. Adriana chooses a passage from Racine’s Phèdre, in which the heroine denounces sinners and adulterous women, and aims her performance directly at the princess. The princess is determined to have her revenge.

ACT IV
Adriana has retired from the stage, devastated by the loss of Maurizio. Members of her theater company visit her on her birthday, bringing presents and trying to persuade her to return. Adriana is especially moved by Michonnet’s gift: the jewellery she had once pawned to secure Maurizio’s release from prison. A box is delivered, labeled “from Maurizio.” When Adriana opens it, she finds the faded bouquet of violets she had once given him and understands it as a sign that their love is at an end (“Poveri fiori”). She kisses the flowers, then throws them into the fire. Moments later, Maurizio arrives, summoned by Michonnet. He apologizes and asks Adriana to marry him. She joyfully accepts but suddenly turns pale. Michonnet and Maurizio realize that the violets were sent by the princess and had been poisoned by her. Adriana dies in Maurizio’s arms (“Ecco la luce”).





The Metropolitan Opera: Carmen


SHOW TIMES


LIVE!
Saturday, February 2nd
at
12:55PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday, February 6th
at
1:00PM and 6:30PM

Saturday, February 9th
at
12:55PM

Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  Carmen

Running time: 3 hours 40 minutes

Not Rated
Sung in French with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Louis Langrée
STARRING -- Clémentine Margaine, Roberto Alagna   
 
ACT I
In Seville by a cigarette factory, soldiers comment on the townspeople. Among them is Micaëla, a peasant girl, who asks for a corporal named Don José. Moralès, another corporal, tells her he will return with the changing of the guard. The relief guard, headed by Lieutenant Zuniga, soon arrives, and José learns from Moralès that Micaëla has been looking for him. When the factory bell rings, the men of Seville gather to watch the female workers—especially their favorite, the Gypsy Carmen. She tells her admirers that love is free and obeys no rules. Only one man pays no attention to her: Don José. Carmen throws a flower at him, and the girls go back to work. José picks up the flower and hides it when Micaëla returns. She brings a letter from José’s mother, who lives in a village in the countryside. As he begins to read the letter, Micaëla leaves. José is about to throw away the flower when a fight erupts inside the factory between Carmen and another girl. Zuniga sends José to retrieve the Gypsy. Carmen refuses to answer Zuniga’s questions, and José is ordered to take her to prison. Left alone with him, she entices José with suggestions of a rendezvous at Lillas Pastia’s tavern. Mesmerized, he agrees to let her get away. As they leave for prison, Carmen escapes. Don José is arrested.

ACT II
Carmen and her friends Frasquita and Mercédès entertain the guests at the tavern. Zuniga tells Carmen that José has just been released. The bullfighter Escamillo enters, boasting about the pleasures of his profession, and flirts with Carmen, who tells him that she is involved with someone else. After the tavern guests have left with Escamillo, the smugglers Dancaïre and Remendado explain their latest scheme to the women. Frasquita and Mercédès are willing to help, but Carmen refuses because she is in love. The smugglers withdraw as José approaches. Carmen arouses his jealousy by telling him how she danced for Zuniga. She dances for him now, but when a bugle call is heard he says he must return to the barracks. Carmen mocks him. To prove his love, José shows her the flower she threw at him and confesses how its scent made him not lose hope during the weeks in prison. She is unimpressed: if he really loved her, he would desert the army and join her in a life of freedom in the mountains. José refuses, and Carmen tells him to leave. Zuniga bursts in, and in a jealous rage José fights him. The smugglers return and disarm Zuniga. José now has no choice but to join them.

ACT III
Carmen and José quarrel in the smugglers’ mountain hideaway. She admits that her love is fading and advises him to return to live with his mother. When Frasquita and Mercédès turn the cards to tell their fortunes, they foresee love and riches for themselves, but Carmen’s cards spell death—for her and for José. Micaëla appears, frightened by the mountains and afraid to meet the woman who has turned José into a criminal. She hides when a shot rings out. José has fired at an intruder, who turns out to be Escamillo. He tells José that he has come to find Carmen, and the two men fight. The smugglers separate them, and Escamillo invites everyone, Carmen in particular, to his next bullfight. When he has left, Micaëla emerges and begs José to return home. He agrees when he learns that his mother is dying, but before he leaves he warns Carmen that they will meet again.

ACT IV
Back in Seville, the crowd cheers the bullfighters on their way to the arena. Carmen arrives on Escamillo’s arm, and Frasquita and Mercédès warn her that José is nearby. Unafraid, she waits outside the entrance as the crowds enter the arena. José appears and begs Carmen to forget the past and start a new life with him. She calmly tells him that their affair is over: she was born free and free she will die. The crowd is heard cheering Escamillo. José keeps trying to win Carmen back. She takes off his ring and throws it at his feet before heading for the arena. José stabs her to death.





The Metropolitan Opera: La Fille du Régiment


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LIVE!
Saturday, March 2nd
at
12:55PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday, March 6th
at
1:00PM and 6:30PM


Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  La Fille du Régiment

Running time: 2 hours 55 minutes

Not Rated
Sung in French with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Enrique Mazzola
STARRING -- Pretty Yende, Javier Camarena, Maurizio Muraro, Stephanie Blythe   
 
ACT I
The Tyrolean mountains. On their way to Austria, the terrified Marquise of Berkenfield and her butler, Hortensius, have paused in their journey because they have found the French army blocking their way. When the marquise hears from the villagers that the French troops have at last retreated, she comments on the crude ways of the French people (“Pour une femme de mon nom”). Hortensius asks Sulpice, sergeant of the 21st regiment, to let the marquise continue on. Sulpice is joined by Marie, the mascot, or “daughter,” of the regiment, which adopted her as an orphaned child. When Sulpice questions her about a young man she has been seen with, she explains that he is a local Tyrolean who—though an enemy—once saved her life. Troops of the 21st arrive with a prisoner: this same Tyrolean, Tonio, who says he has been looking for Marie. She steps in to save him, and while he toasts his new friends, Marie sings the regimental song (“Chacun le sait”). Tonio is ordered to follow the soldiers, but he escapes and returns to declare his love to Marie. Sulpice surprises them, and Marie must admit to Tonio that she can only marry a soldier from the 21st.
The Marquise of Berkenfield asks Sulpice for an escort to return her to her castle. When he hears the name Berkenfield, Sulpice remembers a letter he discovered near the young Marie when she was found. The marquise soon admits that she knew the girl’s father and says that Marie is the long-lost daughter of her sister. The child had been left in the care of the marquise, but was lost on a battlefield. Shocked by the girl’s rough manners, the marquise is determined to take her niece to her castle and to give her a proper education. Tonio has enlisted so that he can marry Marie (“Ah, mes amis”), but she has to leave both her regiment and the man she loves (“Il faut partir”).

ACT II
The marquise has arranged a marriage between Marie and Scipion, nephew of the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Sulpice has joined the marquise at the Berkenfield castle, recovering from an injury and supposed to help her with her plans. The marquise gives Marie a singing lesson, accompanying her at the piano. Encouraged by Sulpice, Marie slips in phrases of the regimental song, and the marquise loses her temper (Trio: “Le jour naissait dans la bocage”). Left alone, Marie thinks about the meaninglessness of money and position (“Par le rang et l’opulence”). She hears soldiers marching in the distance and is delighted when the whole regiment files into the hall. Tonio, Marie, and Sulpice are reunited. Tonio asks for Marie’s hand, declaring that Marie is his whole life (“Pour me rapprocher de Marie”), but the marquise declares her niece engaged to another man and dismisses Tonio. Alone with Sulpice, the marquise confesses the truth: Marie is her own illegitimate daughter whom she abandoned, fearing social disgrace.
Hortensius announces the arrival of the wedding party, headed by the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Marie refuses to leave her room, but when Sulpice tells her that the marquise is her mother, the surprised girl declares that she cannot go against her mother’s wishes and agrees to marry a man that she does not love. As she is about to sign the marriage contract, the soldiers of the 21st regiment, led by Tonio, storm in to rescue their “daughter.” The noble guests are horrified to learn that Marie was a canteen girl, but they change their opinion when she describes her upbringing, telling them that she can never repay the debt she owes the soldiers. The marquise is so moved that she gives her daughter permission to marry Tonio. Everyone joins in a final “Salut à la France.”





The Metropolitan Opera: Die Walküre


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LIVE!
Saturday, March 30th
at
12:00PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday, April 3rd
at
12:30PM and 6:30PM


Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  Die Walküre

Running time: 5 hours 20 minutes

Not Rated
Sung in German with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Philippe Jordan
STARRING -- Christine Goerke, Stuart Skelton, Eva-Maria Westbroek, Greer Grimsley   
 
ACT I
Pursued by enemies during a storm, Siegmund stumbles exhausted into an unfamiliar house. Sieglinde finds him lying by the hearth, and the two feel an immediate attraction. They are interrupted by Sieglinde’s husband, Hunding, who asks the stranger who he is. Calling himself “Woeful,” Siegmund tells of a disaster-filled life, only to learn that Hunding is a kinsman of his enemies. Hunding tells his guest they will fight to the death in the morning.
Alone, Siegmund calls on his father, Wälse, for the sword he once promised him. Sieglinde reappears, having given Hunding a sleeping potion. She tells of her wedding, at which a one-eyed stranger thrust into a tree a sword that has since resisted every effort to pull it out (“Der Männer Sippe”). Sieglinde confesses her unhappiness to Siegmund. He embraces her and promises to free her from her forced marriage to Hunding. As moonlight floods the room, Siegmund compares their feelings to the marriage of love and spring (“Winterstürme wichen dem Wonnemond”). Sieglinde addresses him as “Spring” but asks if his father was really “Wolf,” as he said earlier. When Siegmund gives his father’s name as Wälse instead, Sieglinde recognizes him as her twin brother. Siegmund pulls the sword from the tree and claims Sieglinde as his bride, rejoicing in the union of the Wälsungs.

ACT II
High in the mountains, Wotan, leader of the gods, tells his warrior daughter, the Valkyrie Brünnhilde, that she must defend his mortal son Siegmund in his upcoming battle with Hunding. She leaves joyfully to do what he has asked, as Fricka, Wotan’s wife and the goddess of marriage, appears. Fricka insists that Wotan must defend Hunding’s marriage rights against Siegmund. She ignores his argument that Siegmund could save the gods by winning back the Nibelung Alberich’s all-powerful ring from the dragon Fafner. When Wotan realizes he is caught in his own trap—he will lose his power if he does not enforce the law—he submits to his wife’s demands. After Fricka has left, the frustrated god tells the returning Brünnhilde about the theft of the Rhinegold and Alberich’s curse on it (“Als junger Liebe Lust mir verblich”). Brünnhilde is shocked to hear her father, his plans in ruins, order her to fight for Hunding.
Siegmund comforts his fearful bride and watches over her when she falls asleep. Brünnhilde appears to him as if in a vision, telling him he will soon die and go to Valhalla (“Siegmund! Sieh auf mich!”). He replies that he will not leave Sieglinde and threatens to kill himself and his bride if his sword has no power against Hunding. Moved by his steadfastness, Brünnhilde decides to defy Wotan and help Siegmund. Siegmund bids farewell to Sieglinde when he hears the approaching Hunding’s challenge. The two men fight and Siegmund is about to be victorious, when Wotan appears and shatters his sword, leaving him to be killed by Hunding. Brünnhilde escapes with Sieglinde and the broken sword. Wotan contemptuously kills Hunding with a wave of his hand and leaves to punish Brünnhilde for her disobedience.

ACT III
Brünnhilde’s eight warrior sisters—who have gathered on their mountaintop bearing slain heroes to Valhalla. They are surprised to see Brünnhilde arrive with a woman, Sieglinde. When they hear she is fleeing Wotan’s wrath, they are afraid to hide her. Sieglinde is numb with despair until Brünnhilde tells her she bears Siegmund’s child. Now eager to be saved, she takes the pieces of the sword from Brünnhilde, thanks her, and rushes off into the forest to hide from Wotan. When the god appears, he sentences Brünnhilde to become a mortal woman, silencing her sisters’ objections by threatening to do the same to them. Left alone with her father, Brünnhilde pleads that in disobeying his orders she was really doing what he wished. Wotan will not give in: she must lie in sleep, a prize for any man who finds her. She asks to be surrounded in sleep by a wall of fire that only the bravest hero can pierce. Both sense this hero must be the child that Sieglinde will bear. Sadly renouncing his daughter (“Leb’ wohl, du kühnes, herrliches Kind”), Wotan kisses Brünnhilde’s eyes with sleep and mortality before summoning Loge, the god of fire, to encircle the rock. As flames spring up, the departing Wotan invokes a spell defying anyone who fears his spear to brave the flames.





The Metropolitan Opera: Dialogues des Carmélites


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LIVE!
Saturday, May 11th
at
12:00PM

encore presentations...
Wednesday, May 15th
at
1:00PM and 6:30PM


Fathom Events


The Metropolitan Opera  --  Dialogues des Carmélites

Running time: 3 hours 30 minutes

Not Rated
Sung in French with English subtitles

CONDUCTOR -- Yannick Nézet-Séguin
STARRING -- Isabel Leonard, Karita Mattila   
 
ACT I
Paris, April 1789. The first signs of the French Revolution are beginning to shake the country. The Marquis de la Force and his son, the Chevalier, are worried about Blanche, the Chevalier’s fearful, nervous sister, whose carriage has been held up by a mob on her way home. When Blanche arrives she makes light of the incident, but her anxiety is revealed when a servant’s shadow frightens her as she leaves the room. Shaken, she returns to tell her father that she has made up her mind to become a nun.
Weeks later at the Carmelite convent in Compiègne, Blanche is interviewed by Madame de Croissy, the aged and ailing prioress, who makes it clear to Blanche that the convent is a house of prayer, not a refuge. The prioress is touched by Blanche’s resolve to embrace her new life.
Blanche and young Sister Constance discuss their fear of death, which Constance claims to have overcome. Blanche admits her envy of her companion’s straightforward and easygoing nature. Constance shocks Blanche by telling her that she knows they will both die young and on the same day.
Madame de Croissy is lying on her deathbed, struggling to appear calm. She blesses Blanche and consigns her, as the youngest member of the order, to the care of the loyal Mère Marie. The prioress confesses her fear in the hour of death, then she falls back lifeless.

ACT II
That night in the chapel, Constance and Blanche keep vigil by the prioress’s bier. Blanche is overcome by fear and about to run off, when Mère Marie appears. Realizing that Blanche is genuinely afraid she tries to calm her.
Constance hopes that Mère Marie will be the new prioress. She tells Blanche that she wonders why a god-fearing person like Madame de Croissy had to die such an agonizing death. Perhaps, she says, people don’t die for themselves but for others. Someone else will be surprised one day to find death easy.
Madame Lidoine has been appointed the new prioress. In the chapter room, she addresses the convent, counseling patience and humility. A visitor is announced—it is the Chevalier, Blanche’s brother, who is about to flee the country. He urges Blanche to leave the convent and return to their father. Blanche replies that her duty is to her sisters.
In the sacristy, the chaplain, forbidden to perform his duties, celebrates his last mass. The nuns discuss the fear that has grabbed the country and Mère Marie wonders if self-sacrifice will be their destiny. Madame Lidoine reminds them that martyrs are not chosen by their own will, only by God’s. Knocking is heard and the sounds of an angry crowd. Two Commissioners enter and tell the sisters that they have been expelled from the convent. One of them, speaking quietly to Mère Marie, adds he will do what he can to help them get away safely. One of the sisters gives Blanche a figurine of the Christ Child. When revolutionary cries are heard from outside, Blanche nervously drops the figure, breaking it. She is horrified by this omen.

ACT III
In the devastated chapel, Mère Marie suggests in Madame Lidoine’s absence that they all take a vow of martyrdom by unanimous decision. Noting Blanche’s reaction, the others suspect she will vote against it. When the secret ballot reveals one dissenter, Constance claims it was she and asks to reverse her vote so the vow can proceed. Blanche, afraid to live or to die, runs away. The sisters are led from the convent.
Blanche is forced to work as a servant in the ransacked mansion of her father, who has been sent to the guillotine. Mère Marie finds her there to take her back to the sisters. On the streets, Blanche learns that the nuns have been arrested.
At the Conciergerie prison, Madame Lidoine joins the sisters in their vow of martyrdom. Constance says that she has dreamed of Blanche’s return. A jailer enters and reads the death sentence. Madame Lidoine blesses the sisters. When Mère Marie learns from the chaplain that the nuns will die, she wants to join them, but the chaplain reminds her that it is for God to decide whether or not she will be a martyr.
A crowd has gathered on the Place de la Révolution. The Carmelites walk towards the guillotine, led by Madame Lidoine and singing the Salve Regina. With each stroke of the blade, their voices are cut off one by one, finally leaving only Constance. On her way to the scaffold, she sees Blanche step up from the crowd, take up the chant, and follow her to her death.




George Takei’s Allegiance


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encore presentations...
Tuesday, December 11th
at 7:30PM



Fathom Events


George Takei’s Allegiance

Running time: 2 hours 30 minutes

Rated PG

STARRING -- George Takei, Lea Salonga, Telly Leung   
 
Back by popular demand!

Straight from its Broadway run and inspired by the true-life experience of its star George Takei (Star Trek, Heroes), Allegiance follows one family’s extraordinary journey in this untold American story. Their loyalty was questioned, their freedom taken away, but their spirit could never be broken. Rejoice in one family’s triumphant story of hope, love, and forgiveness in this groundbreaking musical.

Experience George Takei’s ground-breaking Broadway musical on the big screen, featuring an exclusive conversation with the creative team.





Canelo vs. Rocky


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LIVE!
Saturday, December 15th
at 9:00PM



Fathom Events


Canelo vs. Rocky

Running time: 4 hours 30 minutes

Rated R

STARRING -- Canelo Alvarez and Rocky Fielding   
 
World Championship Boxing returns to Madison Square Garden on Saturday, December 15th as the universally recognized Middleweight Champion of the world, and the veritable face of boxing, CANELO ALVAREZ makes his New York City debut when he challenges WBA Super Middleweight Champion ROCKY FIELDING.
Canelo (50-1-2, 34 KOs), the 28-year-old native of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, is without a doubt boxing’s biggest star.  After capturing multiple world titles and the lineal championship in both the super welterweight and middleweight divisions, Canelo has established himself firmly atop the pound-for-pound rankings.  The Mexican superstar will look to capture a world title in a third division when he steps into The Garden’s famed Boxing ring for the first time.
The fighting pride of Liverpool, England, ROCKY FIELDING (27-1, 15 KOs) climbed the 168-pound rankings by fighting the toughest fighters in his native country.  Fielding has scored six victories in a row, including his career-defining win to capture the WBA Super Middleweight World Title in July.  Fielding will defend his title at The Garden in what will be his United States debut.